An African-American Woman Reflects on the Transgender Movement

But what if it were really possible for me to become white or for Pecola to acquire blue eyes? Would that be the end of the story—the happily ever after? Would changing our physical appearance magically erase all our issues of self-esteem and self-worth?

No, of course not. The eyes and the skin color were never the problem: racism and abuse were. We would only be putting a Band-Aid on the real issue. The many men and women who “passed” as white during America’s shameful Jim Crow era may have gained the social privileges bestowed by being white, but they also lost their heritage, their family ties, and their integrity, thanks to the lie they were forced to tell every single day.
— by Nuriddeen Knight

According to gender theory, there are three things that go into gender: the sex nature has assigned a person, the cultural understanding of that sex, and one's own mental gender. A male is cis-gendered (as opposed to transgendered) if he has male sexual organs, he fits in to the social roles of being a man, and mentally he is a man.

But what if you have a man's body, but view yourself as a woman? Are you mentally ill or are you transgendered? When my mind does not agree with reality, does it make sense to say that surgery and make-up will force reality to agree with my mind? Is not the very measurement of mental illness: how far the mind disagrees with reality?

Paradoxically, the more our society tries to free itself from gender stereotypes, the more it becomes enslaved to them. By saying that people can be born in a body of the wrong gender, transgender activists are saying there is a set of feelings that are only allocated to women and another set for men. Therefore, they believe, those who feel things that do not conform to their sex’s acceptable set of feelings must outwardly change their gender to match their mind.